If you have adopted a dog from a shelter, congratulations and                                            Thank You for giving her a chance at life and love. 


Remember when you first bring her in your home to keep her on the leash and “introduce” her to the people, the rooms and the new environment she will be living in. Show her the
backyard, “her” things and let her smell her new world. If she seems fearful,
reassure her and continue the tour until she seems comfortable. Remember, it
could take about a week to a month before she realizes that she is home and fully believes this is her house.

 

Help your new dog feel welcome in his new home by setting aside a place in the house that will be his own. A quiet corner can allow him to be out of the lane of traffic, yet let him see what is going on. Have a dog bed
or crate ready for him where he can keep all his toys. Show him his food and
water bowls. Stainless steel or ceramic are better as they are easy to clean,
durable and do not harbor germs as easily as plastic. Of course, you should already
have a collar or harness and leash, to take him on walks.

 

It is very important to always, keep her leashed when she is outside the house in a non-fenced in area, especially for the first few months. It is very common in the first days for a dog to “bolt” from a new home that
she has not bonded to yet. Sadly, many of these dogs are never found or worse.
Remember that she cannot have enough identification, especially in the
beginning. A tattoo or microchip is an excellent permanent ID but a tag with
your phone number will get her home to you even faster. Make sure you keep the
registry current when you move or get a new number.

 

What to Feed?

 

There are several schools of thought as to what you should feed your new dog, including this site. You might want to spend some time reading the discussions in What’s for Dinner? Something you might want to keep
in mind when you first bring him home is that he probably was not eating Filet
Mignon at the shelter and abrupt changes in diet could cause stomach upset.
Find out what he was eating at the shelter then introduce new food gradually
over several days.

 

You also want to choose a food that is age appropriate. Puppies have different nutrient needs like more protein and calories, as is found in growth formulas, whereas senior dogs need much less of both to maintain
youthful health. Spend some time and do some research on canine nutrition
before you decide what you will feed you canine companion.

 

What to do Next?

 

One of the first things you should do when you bring your new dog home, is schedule a visit to the veterinarian. Make sure you bring any medical records with you as well as a fresh stool sample. Make it a spa day by
having a check-up, grooming and a nail clipping. Make sure you discuss spay or
neuter with your vet. Spaying your dog will not only prevent unwanted
pregnancies but it will also protect your dog from mammary tumors and uterine
infections. Neutering your male dog will protect him from testicular cancer and
prostate problems. These procedures are safe and give your dog a longer,
healthier life.

 

You might want to enroll your puppy in “puppy kindergarten” classes at 11 to 20 weeks to get a start on socialization and behavior training. Enroll in obedience or socialization classes for your older pooch to
set the tone for appropriate behavior. These classes will give you a chance to
bond with each other and if you can work at it with the children, it will teach
them how to behave near their new family member, too.

 

Remember that every dog needs plenty of toys to keep boredom from leading to chewing on the wrong things or constant barking. Allowing him to chew, tug, carry, shake, toss and “kill” toys is an important way to keep
things interesting and him out of trouble. Rotating toys can also keep things
interesting and exciting.

 

Remember, that with patience, time and love your rescued dog will be the most loving family member. 

 

Lynne Fowler

OoD Admin.

 

 

Views: 565

Reply to This

Posts

We just rescued a Labradoodle who is 7 months old; he's been with us for 11 days now (he was in a high kill shelter in GA and rescued by FPR in Florida and they had him for 2 weeks before we adopted him). He's a love but we have a long way to go with behavior.  80% of the time he is sweet and quiet---20% he is doing what we refer to as "actively rejoicing that he is free and has a nice home"! He's all mouth and very playful and knows nothing behavior wise, so we have a long way to go. We've always had Labs from puppyhood so we are prepared for training and will soon start with a trainer.  I must say the jumping and leaping and lunging is new to us--he's like a 2 month old pup in a 7 month old body--is that the "poodle" in the mix?

Sounds like it's the puppy in the mix. He is still a baby and if he was caged for some or all of that time, you are probably right, he is rejoicing that he gets to do what he missed out on. A trainer will help but lots and lots of exercise will also help. You want to wear him out as much as possible to get out that pent up energy. Reward him when he is doing the right things and turn your back on him when he mouths or jumps. Once he stops, then give him your attention and a reward. You have to think of him as a toddler for another few months, I'm afraid. Only time, patience and love will teach him his manners. Make sure you get a trainer who uses positive training methods or you will have a more unruly pup on your hands. Let us know how it goes.

Thanks--it helps to know we are on the right track.  When he gets crazy and starts jumping and grabbing us we do turn our backs but then he leaps at our backs too and stays mouthy---do we just stay turned and endure til he stops? We try to have toys planted around the house so as to be able to put something in his mouth when he gets crazy, but don't always succeed which is painful with his teeth and paws on us. We have lots of time and patience fortunately; we are retired now and most times someone is home and we crate when we leave; he has really adjusted to his crate which he didn't want at all (can't blame him after being caged for so long)....a treat made that be a non-issue very quickly. Although he's 60 pounds we visualize him as a puppy and expect no more.  Thanks for the response!

Most of it will change with age and time but you have to be consistent. I have a "BIG" jumper, (105 lbs) and he actually knocked me down when I first got him and put a couple bite marks on me, the first few times. He mostly did it when I was coming in from work (I don't crate). What worked with him was to have a "cookie" or jerky treat with me when I came in the door and I would stick it in his mouth when he stopped jumping. I would keep repeating "SIT" and as soon as he sat, he'd get it. But it did take a few times, until he put 2 and 2 together. Another trick you could try is a water gun, for some dogs it is enough to get their attention diverted to something else. A clicker or whistle, also might get his attention. But what works with one, won't with another. My big boy likes bring squirted with the water gun but my foster schnoodle hates it and will immediately stop whatever he's doing. When I have a lot of foster dogs here, I will carry a broom. Not to hit them, but smacking it on the ground or something, will also create that surprise noise, to get their attention. Making sure he gets lots and lots of exercise will help the most. Just remember, in a few months all this will be behind you. Hang in there...it gets better. 

Lynn - We are bringing home a 7month old labradoodle resuce tomorrow.  I've just been reading all of your advise and tips and thankful for all the information.  Would you be able to give some tips about introducing our new puppy to our 2 year old Goldendoodle.  As much as I want to make the new puppy feel welcome and secure, I'm really nervous about causing Sophie to feel slighted or neglected.  She has always had our undivided attention.

 

Great question, Karen. There is no reason why Sophie should feel slighted or neglected if you ensure you give her the time she is used to. A 7 month old pup, is not like having a 12 week old puppy who will require loads of time from you. What I would do, is try to introduce them to each other on neutral ground. Maybe a park or even walking them around the block. Let them meet, play, run around and make sure you give each lots of praise and hugs. I would also focus more on Sophie in the first few hours and the puppy will see you are OK and begin to learn about you from your interactions with Sophie. When they first come into Sophie's house, if they are worn out from playing and you have a new bed and "things" for the puppy, point them out and say their names to go with them. You might have separate bowls for a few days, too. Most of it requires you to be "in charge" and make sure they know it. And also, you need to play a lot of it by how they behave. I have brought in foster dog after foster dog and will usually put the crate in the middle of the kitchen floor so everyone can sniff through the bars initially. Once everyone gets bored, I open the crate and let the new one come out when they feel safe. I just don't have the time to introduce slowly. But in general, if you continue to shower Sophie with attention, let the pup join in when she feels comfortable and if Sophie gets a bit growley, tell her no, but remember that growling at a pup is her way of telling her what the story/rules/her place is, so don't berate her too much. Start slow, and it will be fine. Let us know how it goes.

Thanks Lynn.  I'll keep you posted.

We just rescued a beautiful 7.5 month old medium 34 pound goldendoodle from a wonderful foster/rescue. We have looked for a year for a companion for our doodle who is the same size but 3 years old. We have only had the rescue pup for less than a week but things are not working well. Our doodle is depressed, won't eat, doesn't want to come in the house when the new pup is there and doesn't want to go out when she is out. We have seen such a drastic change in our 3 year olds behavior that we are considering rehoming the pup before she gets too use to us. She came from a family with 3 children who were too busy with their lives for her. She is wonderful, sweet, and an easy personality. We have an older 13 y/o golden as well. He is also easy going and just accepts anything. We have tried everything, putting the pup in a room of her own, her own toys, taking her out on a leash instead of letting her run the property with the other dogs as she bites very hard and our 3 y/o hates it. She just cowers. We are very good at training so are using every technique we have been taught.  We drove for 4 hours to get the pup so instead of bringing her back we have decided that we should rehome her somewhere close. We live in northern Illinois. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Hi Terri, usually when I bring in a new foster dog, it takes about 2 weeks before they fit into the pack. I tell all my adopters to give it at least that long before everyone adjusts. Your 3 year old the same amount of attention you normally do and give the new one time to learn the routine and things will work out, if you make it work out. You make the decisions, not the dogs. A dog won't starve and as far as the pup, if she gets enough exercise she should soon settle down and learn the ropes. Let us know how it goes.

Hi Lynn - It's been about 2 months since we brought our rescue home.  It went well the first few weeks, but not so much lately.  Lexi has had the first round of Basic Obedience training and did well.  We were advised by the shelter that crating Lexi was not a good idea and would set her back as she was never crated.  We tried gating, we used a 4' fencing attached to the crate and she managed to escape them.  She has done a number on our furniture.  For lack of anything else to try, I ended up putting her into the crate.  I have done all the recommended treats, toys, activities but I have to force her in, she starts peeing the minute I look for her and she howls and cries so much that I can still hear her as I'm driving away.  Well she has now managed to escaped the crate.  I reinforced it and yesterday I found her still in there but the crate was bent.  I have checked in on her during the day and found her sleeping but I am so frustrated and worry about her safety.  I have tried everything except drugs which I prefer not to do.  I realize this maybe still puppy behavior for chewing but I guess there is anxiety going on as well.

Any ideas would be appreciated!!


 
Karen Schetter said:

Thanks Lynn.  I'll keep you posted.

How old is she now, Karen? I can say that some dogs do go through a very active and destructive "terrible twos" period, just like toddlers can. My best advice is lots and lots of exercise, maybe a puppy daycare a few days a week, might help. The separation anxiety can be a tough one to fix and it is hit and miss until you find what works. For some dogs, leaving a radio or TV on, will help and for others, another dog will help. But hopefully, as she gets older, it will all resolve itself and she will level out. I came home from work one day and my "terrible two," sep anxiety, rescue boy, had eaten/tore apart an entire couch. Now he's 3 years old and he is the most laid back, happy-go-lucky dog. Hang in there is my best advice and keep trying. It will be worth it.

Lynn - Lexi is about 11 months old now.  I have come to the conclusion that most of this behavior is seperation anxiety.  Would you recommend I continue to crate her or just take a chance and leave her free.  Keep in mind that our other dog is free and that my main concern is that she injures herself in some way while trying to get out of the crate.  Thank you so much for the support.
 
Lynne Fowler - Admin said:

How old is she now, Karen? I can say that some dogs do go through a very active and destructive "terrible twos" period, just like toddlers can. My best advice is lots and lots of exercise, maybe a puppy daycare a few days a week, might help. The separation anxiety can be a tough one to fix and it is hit and miss until you find what works. For some dogs, leaving a radio or TV on, will help and for others, another dog will help. But hopefully, as she gets older, it will all resolve itself and she will level out. I came home from work one day and my "terrible two," sep anxiety, rescue boy, had eaten/tore apart an entire couch. Now he's 3 years old and he is the most laid back, happy-go-lucky dog. Hang in there is my best advice and keep trying. It will be worth it.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Have a Comment or Question?

Oodlesofdoodles-rescue@yahoo.com

 

COME FOSTER WITH US CLICK FOR FOSTER APPLICATION

© 2019   - Created, January 19, 2009 by LM Fowler - Admin.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

Oodles of Doodles Rescue, Inc - 501(c)(3) Non-Profit

Oodle ~ Poodle ~ Doodle ~ Fuzzy Critter Rescue / Rehome

THIS is The Original Doodle Rescue Collective Website, since Jan. 2009

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~